alohachingu

Buddy to Buddy

12 posts in this topic

Aloha guys, this is a topic that I want to put out there to you guys.

We are international Buddies of GFriend, right?. Wouldn't it be great if we all could really connect with each other?  

I think so. We can connect with each other through the language, art, cooking, poetry, etc. of our cultures.:D

Since our girls are Korean and their songs are in Hangeul, I just wanted to share these websites with anyone who wants to learn Korean. I know that it'll help me sing their songs better and so on.

and

http://www.learnflylove.com/ 

Both are from Hyungseok Song.

I'm trying to learn myself and this is a start. I think it'll make my step mom happy too...:D

Please feel free to share something about you & your culture. It'd be awesome.

If you want to learn a bit of Hawai'i's culture, I'm more than happy to share.

Fighting!!!

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Hi, I'm Buddy from Indonesia. The one thing that I'm most proud about my country is the foods, tbh. Here is one of the best blog about Indonesian foods you may be interested : https://migrationology.com/indonesian-food/

And here is some videos :

Now I'm hungry, lol. Can you share about Hawaiian foods?

Edited by kirinomoni
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Awesome. What I love about Indonesia is pencak silat and kuntao. I also had a pet praying mantis named Indonesia. In the histories of the Philippines and even older still in Hawai'ian history, we are tied to Indonesia. My elders in my Hawai'ian warrior class have to me that our fighting system and culture has it's roots in Indonesia and India. Many of what is seen in Hawai'i's old culture is very similar to both places. For example, agni - fire, Sanskrit. We say "ahi" - fire because we have no letter "g" in our alphabet. There are 12 letters in our alpha bet, modern Hawai'ian but actually we have 14 letters. Only the elders and younger people use it.

Hawai'ian food, traditionally it was fish, wild boar, chicken, coconut, bread fruit, bananas and a Hawai'ian chili pepper called "nioi", small but dangerous. Taro and other plants.

In Hawai'i everyone usually knows and associates to pig in the ground. I am not sure if you eat meat so please for give me if you don't but I want to share  it anyways..for starters at least. It takes a long while and the right rocks. But here's one oven option.

The dish is called Kalua pig. Ka - means the and lua means pit. The oven is a side ways pit...:D

4-5 lbs pork butt or shoulder

sea salt

liquid smoke

Preheat oven @ 275 degrees. Make a couple of slits on each side of the pork. Rub a small hand full of side  over the pig, then rub about a dime size portion of liquid smoke on both sides. Make sure to get into the slits. Wrap the pork tightly with foil. Poke a couple of holes on each side. Place it in a baking dish. Set it in the oven for 10-12 hours. Do not peek inside while cooking. Let the oven do it's work. Once it's done, shred it with two forks.

Chicken can be done the same way but I need to ask my grandma for the times.

Traditionally when this was done in the ground, called an imu, the pork, chicken, fish and bananas were cooked at the same time.

I'll ask my grandma for proper recipes and share it here.

Could you share some recipes too?

Hawai'i is a mix of culture so I grew up around a lot of Asian and Polynesia foods. Being Polynesian Asian, I grew up with some of the best cultures food stuffs.

*side note - our vowels are pronounced: A - ah, E - eh, I - ee, O - oh, U - ooh. H K L M P W. T and R were taking out by missionaries but it is still used in some places.

Annyeong!!!

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The majority of Indonesian are Muslims, so most of us don't eat pork, but the non-Muslims do. I'm a Chinese-Indonesian so I eat it, hehehe. There is no Hawaiian restaurant here in my country so it's my first time hearing about Kalua Pig. Thank you for the recipe! :) 

I only love to eat but I'm not a good cook so I have no confidence to share any recipes :(. But I want to share a video of one of the simplest-made Indonesian street food called Gado-Gado :

(yea, he is the same guy in my previous links, lol).

Indonesian foods use many spices & seasonings. We really like to eat Sambal (hot sauce), one of the most familiar is Sambal Terasi, consists of  grinded chili pepper, tomato, salt, and shrimp pasted. We also have that one tiny green chili pepper called Rawit, which we usually eat with some deep-fried foods. Oh, Indonesian has white rice as our staple food (same as Koreans & Japanese, I guess).

Wow I just knew that Hawaii language is related to Sanskrit, too. Sanskrit is like the root of Bahasa Indonesia, actually. Many Indonesian words are influenced by Sanskrit, since in the ancient time Indonesia consists of Hinduism & Buddhism empires. Indonesia has shibboleth called "Bhinneka Tunggal Ika", derived from Sanskrit, which is literally means "Unity in Diversity" (since Indonesia has multiple cultures & races).

Sorry I'm just curious, currently do you use English as conversational language or you just use Hawaii language? Is there any place in Hawaii that use English? Indonesia is a multicultural country, so we have many ethnics here. We use our own vernacular locally, but there are times when we use Bahasa in conversations.

Edited by kirinomoni
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My mom's korean and my dad's american, I can speak and understand korean but I'm not very good at reading and writing it , I'm good enough to teach it a bit tho (I live in the U.S and my first language is English). About a year ago my family became Muslim, there were a lot of things being portrayed about Islam in the media that weren't necessarily positive so my dad wanted to find out the the truth. He started researching and then told us what he learned. It's actually such a beautiful and peaceful religion so we converted. I'm learning arabic right now so i can read the qur'an. I can transliterate the arabic but I can't translate it. I want to learn more so if any of you wanna tell me more I'm interested. Also I like learning about other cultures so please talk about yours, I would love to learn more about everyone. 

Edited by whennooneslooking
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7 hours ago, kirinomoni said:

The majority of Indonesian are Muslims, so most of us don't eat pork, but the non-Muslims do. I'm a Chinese-Indonesian so I eat it, hehehe. There is no Hawaiian restaurant here in my country so it's my first time hearing about Kalua Pig. Thank you for the recipe! :) 

I only love to eat but I'm not a good cook so I have no confidence to share any recipes :(. But I want to share a video of one of the simplest-made Indonesian street food called Gado-Gado :

(yea, he is the same guy in my previous links, lol).

Indonesian foods use many spices & seasonings. We really like to eat Sambal (hot sauce), one of the most familiar is Sambal Terasi, consists of  grinded chili pepper, tomato, salt, and shrimp pasted. We also have that one tiny green chili pepper called Rawit, which we usually eat with some deep-fried foods. Oh, Indonesian has white rice as our staple food (same as Koreans & Japanese, I guess).

Wow I just knew that Hawaii language is related to Sanskrit, too. Sanskrit is like the root of Bahasa Indonesia, actually. Many Indonesian words are influenced by Sanskrit, since in the ancient time Indonesia consists of Hinduism & Buddhism empires. Indonesia has shibboleth called "Bhinneka Tunggal Ika", derived from Sanskrit, which is literally means "Unity in Diversity" (since Indonesia has multiple cultures & races).

Sorry I'm just curious, currently do you use English as conversational language or you just use Hawaii language? Is there any place in Hawaii that use English? Indonesia is a multicultural country, so we have many ethnics here. We use our own vernacular locally, but there are times when we use Bahasa in conversations.

 

2 hours ago, whennooneslooking said:

My mom's korean and my dad's american, I can speak and understand korean but I'm not very good at reading and writing it , I'm good enough to teach it a bit tho (I live in the U.S and my first language is English). About a year ago my family became Muslim, there were a lot of things being portrayed about Islam in the media that weren't necessarily positive so my dad wanted to find out the the truth. He started researching and then told us what he learned. It's actually such a beautiful and peaceful religion so we converted. I'm learning arabic right now so i can read the qur'an. I can transliterate the arabic but I can't translate it. I want to learn more so if any of you wanna tell me more I'm interested. Also I like learning about other cultures so please talk about yours, I would love to learn more about everyone. 

Aloha guys, okay my cousin is a Muslim convert so I know that Muslims do not eat pork. Also, when it comes to any spiritual path, I do not judge at all. A culture is a culture and a "people" is a "people"

Now, here's a Hawaiian recipe that is a big winner anywhere in the islands. When a school or any organization does a fundraiser the smell of this type of chicken fills a few blocks. It's called "Huli Huli Chicken". Huli in Hawaiian means to turn. Huli Huli just means keep turning. This one is just done on a grill but usually it is done on huge rotisserie grills. You can try this out.

 

Edited by alohachingu
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Cool guys. Thank you. I was hoping something would happen with this post. 

Just ask away. I'd be more than happy to share.

*People think that pineapples are originally from Hawai'i but they are originally from India. Crazy ass plantation days, heh heh.

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18 hours ago, whennooneslooking said:

My mom's korean and my dad's american, I can speak and understand korean but I'm not very good at reading and writing it , I'm good enough to teach it a bit tho (I live in the U.S and my first language is English). About a year ago my family became Muslim, there were a lot of things being portrayed about Islam in the media that weren't necessarily positive so my dad wanted to find out the the truth. He started researching and then told us what he learned. It's actually such a beautiful and peaceful religion so we converted. I'm learning arabic right now so i can read the qur'an. I can transliterate the arabic but I can't translate it. I want to learn more so if any of you wanna tell me more I'm interested. Also I like learning about other cultures so please talk about yours, I would love to learn more about everyone. 

yes all religions are beautiful, just some people make it seems bad. most of my friends are Muslims so the culture is pretty familiar for me. Do you often go to Korea?

15 hours ago, alohachingu said:

*People think that pineapples are originally from Hawai'i but they are originally from India. Crazy ass plantation days, heh heh.

I used to think that all tropical fruits were coming from Hawaii, hahahaha.

Edited by kirinomoni
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7 hours ago, kirinomoni said:

yes all religions are beautiful, just some people make it seems bad. most of my friends are Muslims so the culture is pretty familiar for me. Do you often go to Korea?

I used to think that all tropical fruits were coming from Hawaii, hahahaha.

We do grow a lot of tropical fruit. It's really our volcanic soil. I do have mango and lychee picking stories. I really think that Yuju would like to hear them, hint hint.

Here's another fact, actually really redundant about Hawai'i's foodstuff. If you're familiar with our foodstuff and Japanese sushi, you'll see on the menu "Ahi Tuna Poke", redundant. Ahi in Hawaiian means refers to the tuna fish. Poke in Hawaiian means to slice. It's like saying "Tuna Tuna Sushi slices".

So basically, anywhere that you see or hear Ahi Tuna they are probably trying their best to sell tuna or really trying to cheat you. Hah hah.

 

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So, it is Friday 2016/08/26 in the U.S.

Every Friday in Hawai'i is known as "Aloha Friday". Since Friday is the end of the work week and the beginning of the weekend, Hawai'i celebrates it every week. It's like saying "All the chaos of the week is done, let it go. Start fresh with a good weekend in to the new week."

Usually this is when you see Hawai'i locals where their "Aloha or Hawaiian attire" and leis(flower garlands), side note - "lei" actually means beloved in Hawaiian. It is a gift that you give to someone you respect. Also,there are lunch and dinner specials at different eateries and small entertainment shows at local venues throughout the day, especially at shopping malls.

Some people really get into it more than others but still, it's something that is celebrated at variant degrees throughout the islands.

When that clock it's the end that work shift, it's "Pau Hana time"(Pow Hah-Nah), meaning work is done. Partying begins.

So, have a great "Aloha Friday". If Saturday has already started for you, have a great weekend.:D

:Bang::Bang::Bang:

post script, I do not wear floral prints except for that one "surf shorts", board shorts, that I wear. I have aloha inside and flowers really do not look good on me.

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On 8/26/2016 at 9:27 AM, kirinomoni said:

yes all religions are beautiful, just some people make it seems bad. most of my friends are Muslims so the culture is pretty familiar for me. Do you often go to Korea?

I used to think that all tropical fruits were coming from Hawaii, hahahaha.

I just got back last week lol, my mom made us go for independence day and she gave us this entire history lecture

Edited by whennooneslooking
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How is the Independence Day celebrated? I ask this because here on the mainland U.S., Hawai'i's true Independence Day called La Ku'oko'a, November 20th,1843 was illegal intervened by the United States in the year 1893 with the overthrow of Queen...and yet our kingdom still has remained to this day.

The "state' of Hawai'i has celebrated the independence of the U.S. since 1959 and yet still I really don't know what that its. Hah hah.

U.S. Independence day celebrations, get drunk and set of some fireworks? Yeah(Can you feel the sarcasm here?) In Hawai'i it's different. Hawai'i was still a country at the time. The 4th of July is almost like any other day, unless you're near a military base or a bar. Some organizations will have fireworks displays, whatevers.

New 's Years Eve on the other hand...the island of O'ahu blows up, major fireworks. It is close to the Chinese Lunar New Year so it's almost a month apart. The Chinese Lunar New Year is important to Hawai'i's people. A lot of us are mixed Polynesians, usually Hawaiian + Chinese, or Korean, or Japanese or Filipino mixes. You could even meet a Hawaiian/Chinese/Korean/Filipino person.

Sorry, I just want to know.

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